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HA☆NA☆SE!

A place full of Yu-Gi-Oh! and the occasional other things... yeah...
Aug 30 '14
h0odrich:

pythonoid:

stunningpicture:

This is the single best Ask Amy response I’ve ever read

i love it when people who do shit things write in asks to validate their shittiness and it backfires. It feeds me

OK ASK AMY W THE SWIFT #CLAPBACK

h0odrich:

pythonoid:

stunningpicture:

This is the single best Ask Amy response I’ve ever read

i love it when people who do shit things write in asks to validate their shittiness and it backfires. It feeds me

OK ASK AMY W THE SWIFT #CLAPBACK

Aug 30 '14
rs620:

Queer Politics and Anti-Blackness

The poster in Figure 9.1 — from a protest Following the passage of California’s Proposition 8 same-sex marriage ban, which we will come back to throughout this chapter — illustrates one way in which anti-blackness plays out within LGBT politics. Notice two things: first, that the poster lists simply ‘African American’ in its to-do list — instead of, perhaps, ‘African American Rights’ — and second, that there is a check mark beside it, signaling its completion. What was perhaps an oversight by its author points to the widespread notion that black people having rights is both redundant (already done) and oxymoronic (impossible). In effect, black people are the paradigmatically progressed population and at the same time incapable of advancing on the path of progress. Gay rights (which apparently have no overlap with either women’s rights or ‘African Americans’), on the other hand, are both possible and unfinished. And so the proclamation resounds: ‘Gay is the New Black!”
[…]
The centrality of legal equality claims to gay and lesbian rights politics and the specific investment of them in accessing and expanding key institutions is often accomplished through the deployment of a ‘like black’ civil rights analogy. Sexton observes that this analogy is a key technology of anti-blackness in non-black social movements. He describes the ‘peculiar, long standing and cross-racial phenomenon’ where a range of struggles allegorize themselves to revolts against slavery, meanwhile the suffering of black people during slavery and its afterlife is something perpetually figured as already known and addressed, not needing to be further discussed, and of course, mainly historical.  Sexton writes:

"The metaphoric transfer that dismisses the legitimacy of black struggles against racial slavery (and…its ‘functional surrogates’) while it appropriates black suffering as the template for non-black grievances remains one of the defining features of contemporary political culture." (Sexton 2006: 42)

White gay and lesbian rights advocates and the lawyers who lead their charge consistently analogize the gay and lesbian rights struggle to the black civil rights movement. Examples abound. Lawrence v. Texas, the Supreme Court decision finding sodomy statutes unconstitutional, was lauded as ‘our Brown v. Board of Education’. Same-sex marriage advocates consistently analogize their struggle to Loving v. Virginia, the I967 case in which the Supreme Court declared anti-miscegenation laws unconstitutional. More broadly, the articulation of the fight for same-sex marriage or gay and lesbian rights generally as a ‘frontier’ of civil rights, or sometimes ‘the final Frontier of the civil rights movement’. This analogy, of course, heavily relies on the idea that the civil rights movement successfully freed black people and made them equal, thus gay and lesbian rights can be framed as the ‘new frontier’ since the others have been accomplished. Recall that decisive check mark next to ‘African American’ on the poster we invoked earlier: the trope maintains that ‘other’ populations (especially black people) have been freed by legal equality and now it is time to complete the project of American Freedom by granting legal equality to (apparently non-black) lesbian and gay people. The triumphant and well-circulated claim that ‘Gay is the New Black’ performs dual labor: first, it disappears the unspectacular and enduring conditions of black suffering that persist in the neoliberal era. Second, it appropriates the apparently satisfied struggle of black people. Remember that it does not say ‘Gay = Black’, but that ‘Gay is the New Black’ — it’s suffering exhausted, passé, black is no longer ‘black enough’. Black, not needing to be black anymore, has now objectively passed on its reference point to gay, which is not black, and which apparently needs it more.

rs620:

Queer Politics and Anti-Blackness

The poster in Figure 9.1 — from a protest Following the passage of California’s Proposition 8 same-sex marriage ban, which we will come back to throughout this chapter — illustrates one way in which anti-blackness plays out within LGBT politics. Notice two things: first, that the poster lists simply ‘African American’ in its to-do list — instead of, perhaps, ‘African American Rights’ — and second, that there is a check mark beside it, signaling its completion. What was perhaps an oversight by its author points to the widespread notion that black people having rights is both redundant (already done) and oxymoronic (impossible). In effect, black people are the paradigmatically progressed population and at the same time incapable of advancing on the path of progress. Gay rights (which apparently have no overlap with either women’s rights or ‘African Americans’), on the other hand, are both possible and unfinished. And so the proclamation resounds: ‘Gay is the New Black!”

[…]

The centrality of legal equality claims to gay and lesbian rights politics and the specific investment of them in accessing and expanding key institutions is often accomplished through the deployment of a ‘like black’ civil rights analogy. Sexton observes that this analogy is a key technology of anti-blackness in non-black social movements. He describes the ‘peculiar, long standing and cross-racial phenomenon’ where a range of struggles allegorize themselves to revolts against slavery, meanwhile the suffering of black people during slavery and its afterlife is something perpetually figured as already known and addressed, not needing to be further discussed, and of course, mainly historical.  Sexton writes:

"The metaphoric transfer that dismisses the legitimacy of black struggles against racial slavery (and…its ‘functional surrogates’) while it appropriates black suffering as the template for non-black grievances remains one of the defining features of contemporary political culture." (Sexton 2006: 42)

White gay and lesbian rights advocates and the lawyers who lead their charge consistently analogize the gay and lesbian rights struggle to the black civil rights movement. Examples abound. Lawrence v. Texas, the Supreme Court decision finding sodomy statutes unconstitutional, was lauded as ‘our Brown v. Board of Education’. Same-sex marriage advocates consistently analogize their struggle to Loving v. Virginia, the I967 case in which the Supreme Court declared anti-miscegenation laws unconstitutional. More broadly, the articulation of the fight for same-sex marriage or gay and lesbian rights generally as a ‘frontier’ of civil rights, or sometimes ‘the final Frontier of the civil rights movement’. This analogy, of course, heavily relies on the idea that the civil rights movement successfully freed black people and made them equal, thus gay and lesbian rights can be framed as the ‘new frontier’ since the others have been accomplished. Recall that decisive check mark next to ‘African American’ on the poster we invoked earlier: the trope maintains that ‘other’ populations (especially black people) have been freed by legal equality and now it is time to complete the project of American Freedom by granting legal equality to (apparently non-black) lesbian and gay people. The triumphant and well-circulated claim that ‘Gay is the New Black’ performs dual labor: first, it disappears the unspectacular and enduring conditions of black suffering that persist in the neoliberal era. Second, it appropriates the apparently satisfied struggle of black people. Remember that it does not say ‘Gay = Black’, but that ‘Gay is the New Black’ — it’s suffering exhausted, passé, black is no longer ‘black enough’. Black, not needing to be black anymore, has now objectively passed on its reference point to gay, which is not black, and which apparently needs it more.

Aug 30 '14

u asked for it

I’m so happy

Aug 30 '14

katnissofdauntless:

Guys it’s really important during this whole ferguson protest that we as social media DO NOT back down until punishment is dealt to those racists. If we let this movement die, then the oppressors win. I’ve seen stuff like this before and the majority of people stop posting about it within a week. We can’t let that happen, this is too important. so keep reblogging and keep posting until these darn racists are punished for their awful inhumane actions. 

Aug 30 '14

wwonderful:

what the fuck is wrong with u people if a person wants to wear a grandpa sweater and a flowercrown while drinking a pumpkin spice latte fucking let them live their life the last thing they probably need is your broke judgmental ass giving them hella negative vibes cause you don’t like their life choices bye

(Source: animericans)

Aug 30 '14
putuksstuff:

mushroom-just-one:

This is why Wario is the best Mario character

putuksstuff:

mushroom-just-one:

This is why Wario is the best Mario character

Aug 30 '14
sexhaver:

stantler:

grab-the-sushi-and-run:

ASH KETCHUM YOU LUCKY BOY YOU GOT TO DO EVERYTHINGAWESOME IN THE POKEMON WORLD IT’S NOT FAIR ANYMORE

he never got to grow up, spend time with his family, or have a family of his own. he has a 5th grade education at best, hes essentially homeless, and the only friend hes retained through all of his travels is a mouse. 

he is literally riding the god of the oceans like a fucking flying horse do you think he gives a rat’s ass about his education

sexhaver:

stantler:

grab-the-sushi-and-run:

ASH KETCHUM YOU LUCKY BOY YOU GOT TO DO EVERYTHINGAWESOME IN THE POKEMON WORLD IT’S NOT FAIR ANYMORE

he never got to grow up, spend time with his family, or have a family of his own. he has a 5th grade education at best, hes essentially homeless, and the only friend hes retained through all of his travels is a mouse. 

he is literally riding the god of the oceans like a fucking flying horse do you think he gives a rat’s ass about his education

Aug 30 '14

(Source: yazzydream)

Aug 30 '14
inuconen:

AU where they meet after Yugi stands up for Yami as children. Because why not?

inuconen:

AU where they meet after Yugi stands up for Yami as children. Because why not?

Aug 30 '14
tastefullyoffensive:

There are two kinds of parrots…

tastefullyoffensive:

There are two kinds of parrots…

(Source: ForGIFs.com)

Aug 30 '14

aminoasinine:

new 3ds with new buttons and features

image

new games that aren’t compatible with the old 3ds

image

Aug 30 '14

lzayoi:

lzayoi:

Wtf im going to feed my dog a chicken nugget

image

Aug 29 '14

lychgate:

OHAYO USA.

image

I GOTTA FEELING THAT ITS GONNA BE A KAWAII DAY

image

Aug 29 '14

piscula:

"this is the internet, i can say whatever i want" is a super creepy and obvious way to say "when there are no obvious consequences for my actions i lack all empathy"

(Source: womxxn)

Aug 29 '14

cosbyykidd:

grandmasterbooty:

Distressing Video Captures EXACTLY How Cops Treat Black People

smh